Commas in Addresses

Use a comma to separate each part of an address that has two or more parts. This follows the same pattern as geographical names. Commas are not needed if prepositions join the address parts. Incorrect: Write me in care of Post Office Box 203 Shelton Connecticut 06484. (Commas needed) Correct: Write me in care of

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Commas with Titles that Follow Names

Each title that follows a name is set off by commas. Incorrect: Kenneth Griffey Jr. could have broken Maris’ record. Correct: Kenneth Griffey, Jr., could have broken Maris’ record. Correct, if pompous: The book was written by John Kenneth Galbraith, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., D.Sc., Litt.D. (Note that each title is set off by commas.) Numerical

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Commas with Dates

When a date is made up of two or more parts, use a comma to separate the parts when the parts both are words or both are numbers. A second comma follows the last item unless it is at the end of a list or sentence. Incorrect: We will meet Friday July 15. (Word Friday

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Commas with Geographical Names

When a geographical name or location has two or more parts to it, use a comma after each different type of part. A second comma follows the last item, unless it comes at the end of the sentence. Incorrect: I meant Pittsburg Kansas instead of Pittsburgh Pennsylvania. (Commas needed to separate city and state) Incorrect:

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Commas with Nonrestrictive Modifiers

A modifying word, phrase, or clause following a noun is set off by commas if it presents information which is not essential to identify the noun or the meaning of the sentence. This is called a nonrestrictive modifier, i.e., it does not restrict the meaning of the noun or sentence. Example: Any student not sitting

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